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Monday, 18 March 2013 11:19

Apple never learns about security

Written by Nick Farrell



Thinks fingerprints are cool

Apple is proving how clueless it is about security by backing a method of replacing passwords with fingerprint readers.

Just days after a scandal where a South American hospital was staffed by phantom doctors who used silicon fingers of their colleagues to convince adminstrators’ finger print readers that they were working, Apple has decided that they are the perfect form of security.

Word on the street is that Apple is said to be planning to introduce an iPhone that can be unlocked by the owner's fingerprint. Speculation about Apple's plans for fingerprint recognition began last summer when the iPhone maker bought biometric security firm AuthenTec for £235 million.

It is believed that the iPhone 5S will have a fingerprint chip under the Home button, to “improve security and usability." Meanwhile in an engineering journal, two Google security experts outlined plans for an ID ring or smartphone chip that could replace online passwords, which is a lot sexier than fingerprint scanning.

Nick Farrell

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