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Friday, 04 June 2010 13:02

Google's switch from Microsoft could cause security problems

Written by Nick Farell


Image

Insecurity outfit wades in


An insecurity
outfit has waded into Google for insisting that people no longer use Microsoft software at its head office.

Earlier this week, Google announced that its staff will require special permission to install Microsoft operating systems and software on their computers. But Mickey Bodaei, CEO of secure browsing specialist Trusteer said Google's shift away from Microsoft could lead to more security problems than it solves.

He said that enterprises that are considering shifting to an operating system like Mac or Linux should realise that, although there are less malware programmes available against these platforms, the shift will not solve the targetted attacks problem and may even make it worse. Bodaei added that Mac and Linux are not more secure than Windows. They're less targeted.

When it comes to targeted attacks, this approach offers little value and may even increase exposure. If a cyber criminal decides to target a specific enterprise because they're interested in its data assets, they can very easily learn the type of platform used - for example Mac or Linux - and then build malware that attacks this platform and release it against the targeted enterprise.

Security products for Mac and Linux are years behind those that are available for Windows and would be unable to cope.

Nick Farell

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