Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 04 June 2010 13:02

Google's switch from Microsoft could cause security problems

Written by Nick Farell


Image

Insecurity outfit wades in


An insecurity
outfit has waded into Google for insisting that people no longer use Microsoft software at its head office.

Earlier this week, Google announced that its staff will require special permission to install Microsoft operating systems and software on their computers. But Mickey Bodaei, CEO of secure browsing specialist Trusteer said Google's shift away from Microsoft could lead to more security problems than it solves.

He said that enterprises that are considering shifting to an operating system like Mac or Linux should realise that, although there are less malware programmes available against these platforms, the shift will not solve the targetted attacks problem and may even make it worse. Bodaei added that Mac and Linux are not more secure than Windows. They're less targeted.

When it comes to targeted attacks, this approach offers little value and may even increase exposure. If a cyber criminal decides to target a specific enterprise because they're interested in its data assets, they can very easily learn the type of platform used - for example Mac or Linux - and then build malware that attacks this platform and release it against the targeted enterprise.

Security products for Mac and Linux are years behind those that are available for Windows and would be unable to cope.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments