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Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 28 December 2009 10:41

Chinese writer sues Google

Written by Nick Farell

ImageImage

Nicked my books

The Chinese author so great they named her twice, Mian Mian is suing the search engine Google for stealing her content. For those unfamiliar with Mian Mian's work they usually involve tales of sex, drugs and alcohol in the underworld.

It is believed to be  the first civil lawsuit against Google in China over the scanning of books into its controversial web library. The 39-year-old Mian Mian's first book, Candy, was a tale about about prostitutes, gangsters and artists in the southern boomtown of Shenzhen. Now she wants a fairly modest $8,900 in damages.

Apparently the search engine outfit illegally scanned her third novel "Acid Lovers" into its digital library, Sun said. Mian Mian's books are largely banned in China as being too saucy although apparently the are top of the black market book list.

However according to the China Written Works Copyright Society, tens of thousands of books by hundreds of Chinese authors have been added to Google Books, the US Internet giant's project to digitise millions of books and post them online. While the Society does not want Google to give up on its digital book project in China, it wants Google to admit its mistake and apologise, then talk about compensation.


Last modified on Monday, 28 December 2009 10:50

Nick Farell

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