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Tuesday, 06 September 2011 09:40

Coppers want to shut websites without a court order

Written by Nick Farell
y_lawbookhammer

Nominet might let them
Police are asking Nominet for the power to request a domain be blocked without a court order. The Serious and Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) has asked Nominet to move ahead with rules (PDF) that could allow law enforcement agencies to request a domain be shut down without a court order.

Apparently Nominet is OK with the idea. Currently Nominet’s rules don’t allow for domains to be shut down for criminal reasons, though in the past it has blocked domains at the request of law enforcement agencies on the pretext that they provided false contact details.

Nominet's plans will mean that suspension of a domain will not require a court order but should be limited to circumstances where necessary “to prevent serious and immediate consumer harm”. It would only cover serious crime cases in the UK which apparently means fraud, prostitution, money laundering, blackmail and copyright infringement. Not quite sure how prostitution and copyright infringement became a serious crime.

Nominet would only accept take-down requests from law enforcement bodies with which it has a trusted relationship so Neighbourhood Watch schemes are probably not included, nor local vigilantes.


Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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Comments  

 
0 #1 pogsnet 2011-09-06 11:57
This is so vague idea.

"to prevent serious and immediate consumer harm"

It should be this way, i make it simple:

1. That could be a scamming sites
2. Virus, spyware, malware infested sites
3. Fake site
4. Uncensored adult sites. There should be proper identification process before anyone can access adult sites.

---
The copyright issues should be settled in court and other technical issues because that is subject for scrutiny.
 
 
+1 #2 JEskandari 2011-09-06 16:46
Who must decide what's fraud and what's not fraud
in old days it was court but seems todays police
also can do that it seems each day we are going
to be closer to this dream
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Judge_Dredd_%28film%29

at least it's a wet dream for some people
 
 
+1 #3 123s 2011-09-06 17:11
"here should be proper identification process before anyone can access adult sites"

The are you 18 thing ? Wonder if it ever stopped somebody xd
 

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