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Monday, 08 November 2010 10:08

Microsoft got Kinect because Apple was a pain in the arse

Written by Nick Farell
microsoftapple

PrimeSense targeted the device at Jobs's Mob
Kinect was designed to be an Apple device, but its designers gave it to Microsoft because dealing with Jobs Mob was too difficult.

PrimeSense CEO Inon Beracha, who developed the technology behind connect said that Apple was in the forefront of his mind when considering which Silicon Valley companies he could pitch the technology. Apple was seen as the most logical place to go. After all it was cutting edge technology which involved users looking like prats.

However Apple was just a “pain in the ass," said Beracha and the first meetings had not gone well. Apple wanted him to sign away his life with legal agreements and non-disclosure forms and made life so difficult Beracha took his technology elsewhere.

Nintendo also had a chance to pick up a Kinect-like device and run with it and even saw a working demo of a similar prototype around the end of 2007 and opted not to bring the device on-board. However it did not believe it could work and still didn't even until January.



Nick Farell

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