Featured Articles

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel has revealed an update to its CPU roadmap and some things have changed in 2015 and beyond. Let’s start with the…

More...
Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 23 July 2010 08:31

Intel wants its Atom chips to go 1000 MPH

Written by Nick Farell


Feeding the bloodhound
Intel has announced that its Atom processors will be under the bonnet of the 1000mph car Bloodhound project.

Intel has announced that its processors will be a key component for the Bloodhound, helping to manage the Typhoon fighter aircraft engine which will propel the car. Atom chips will be part of the engine control and display systems. The Bloodhound car aims to be the first to him 1000 mph.

Intel tells us that the processors are similar to those used in netbooks, but have been specifically tweaked for use in industrial and automotive applications. The chips were chosen for their power-saving and performance prowess. Three chips will manage the car's "hybrid" propulsion systems.

Each processor will be checking the others' calculations to guarantee there are no errors. "Another processor will also be used to relay this and other status information, stored on an internal SSD chip, back to the driver on the cockpit displays." Another four processors will help the 'driver', Wing Commander Andy Green, to keep the car on a smooth trajectory.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments