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Friday, 03 August 2007 08:14

Nintendo gets tough on Wii modchips

Written by test
Image

Joins forces with US customs on raid

Nintendo and U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agents have raided some 32 locations in 16 states in connection to illegal console modification, mostly focusing on the Nintendo Wii console.

According to Nintendo this is the biggest raid ever to target video game piracy. However, it turns out that it wasn't just about mod chips, as some 91,000 copied discs has been seized since April in global counterfit operations.

Nintendo claims that it and its partners are lost some US$762 million in sales in 2006 due to piracy. Doesn't sound like any thing near as much as what the music industry or the PC gaming industry are talking about.

In the same raid, mod chips for the Xbox, Xbox 360 and the PS2 was also sized. Aparently counterfitted games costs the U.S. economy $200 to $250 billion per year and is meant to result in the loss of some 750,000 jobs according to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

We can't help but think that this sounds a bit over inflated, but thanks to the DCMA act, the U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agency have the right to raid anyone selling mod chips for consoles in the U.S. of A.

More here (without the Nintento twist) and here (with added Nintendo FUD)

test

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