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Tuesday, 31 July 2007 08:13

VESA approves DisplayPort 1.1

Written by David Stellmack
Image

The new industry standard

VESA (Video Electronics Standards Association) has adopted DisplayPort version 1.1 as the new standard for high-definition PC content. This could spell doom for those who backed the consumer standard HDMI interface that has been making its way into HD products in the consumer realm for some time. VESA says that DisplayPort 1.1 is the next generation interface that will replace the LVDS, DVI, and VGA standards.

VESA claims that it already has support for the DisplayPort standard from AMD, NVIDIA, HP, Intel, Lenovo, and Samsung. Each of these manufacturers has already pledged its support for the standard, although some of them are currently supporting HDMI as well.

Those that are not directly supporting the DisplayPort 1.1 standard claim that HDMI can already do everything that DisplayPort 1.1 can do, and more. This sounds like trouble for the consumer. But if you are thinking of buying a new LCD and want to make sure that you can play HD content in the future, you might want to ensure that you have full HDCP support. “Over which standard?” is the real question.

Many consumers could be left out in the cold because their LCD does not support the right standard moving forward; and since no DisplayPort 1.1 devices are out yet, it seems logical that consumers should continue to look for HDMI compatibility. In the meantime it will be interesting to see how this one shakes out.

Last modified on Tuesday, 31 July 2007 10:45

David Stellmack

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