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Wednesday, 25 July 2007 12:15

BIND hacked

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People can be forced to fraud sites


Security company Trusteer claims that its CTO and security researcher Amit Klein has cracked BIND's random number generator. The hack will enable "DNS Forgery Pharming" in which fraudsters can remotely force consumers to visit fraudulent websites without compromising any computer or network device.

The attack is possible because of the way BIND avoids a DNS response forgery. To stop a fraudster sending a spoofed response with a bogus IP address to the requesting computer, BIND implements a standard DNS security mechanism, based on a randomly-generated number.

The idea is that fraudsters who do not control the route between the user and the DNS server from forging DNS responses and directing the user to the wrong server.

However Klein, has discovered a severe flaw in BIND's implementation which allows fraudsters to efficiently predict the random numbers. Fraudsters can remotely forge DNS responses and direct users to fraudulent websites.

A patch has been developed by ISC against the flaw for those who manage a BIND 9 DNS server.

More here.

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