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Tuesday, 16 February 2010 11:20

Spammers target Buzz

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Already


Spammers
have already targeted Google's Buzz just a few days after it launched. Beancounters at Websense said that when Twitter launched it took a little while before it was targeted by spammers. However, in the case of Buzz it took just two days.

Carl Leonard, security research manager at Websense said that it was s worrying that spammers have an improved knowledge of social networks these days that allows them to hit new services like Google Buzz so quickly.

The security firm said Web 2.0 sites allowing user-generated content are a top target for cybercriminals and spammers, and research revealed that 95 percent of user-generated comments to blogs, chat rooms and message boards are spam or malicious. During the second half of the year, 81 percent of emails contained a malicious link.

Google has admitted that it committed several security blunders when it released Buzz.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
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