Featured Articles

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 11 January 2010 12:02

Beware fake Outlook alerts

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Especially from techies


Insecurity
outfit Red Condor has been intercepting an email phishing campaign spreading faked Microsoft Outlook alerts.

The faked Outlook updates are fast becoming a popular way to implant banking Trojans are then used to access online accounts. The intended victim receives a personalised email message that appears to come from a techie using a return email address from the same domain as the target.

However the numbers which are being sent over the world wide wibble are making it look like the bad guys after playing a numbers game. The software is quite good at customises each message to improve the odds of fooling the recipient. Red Condor researcher Brien Voorhees said that the attack has hit thousands of Red Condor's customer domains. Red Condor has blocked well over a million of these messages, an indicator of a massive spam campaign, originating from a large botnet under control of the attackers.

This latest Outlook attack is similar to a phishing attack that took shape over the course of 2009. Earlier attacks used referencing UPS shipping documents, IRS notices, Vonage account updates, H1N1 alerts and Facebook account updates to get recipients to click on a tainted Web link.

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments