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Tuesday, 24 November 2009 14:16

Eurocrats vote on new telco legislation

Written by Fudzilla staff


Image

Pirates beware


EU lawmakers
are set to vote on a new set of telecom rules that has some punters rather cross at the Union.

One aspect of the new legislation in particular has raised a few eyebrows among techies. Following in the footsteps of France and the UK, the EU is planning to introduce strict penalties for file-shearers.

The EU plans to enforce a new rule under which persons suspected of file sharing could simply be disconnected. However, the wording of this particular rule is somewhat vague and that is what's causing quite a bit of controversy.

The regulation reads:"A user's internet access may be restricted, if necessary and proportionate, only after a fair and impartial procedure including the user's right to be heard." The restrictions can only be imposed "with due respect for the principle of presumption of innocence and the right to privacy".

Unfortunately, EU lawmakers threw out an amendment which stipulated that any disconnect would have to be performed following a court verdict. So at the moment, it's not clear who will conduct the 'fair and impartial' procedure or who will safeguard the principle of presumption of innocence.

While it is clear the EU and every other legislative body must take action to curtail criminal activities, we're a bit miffed that the Union doesn't seem to trust its courts that much.

More here.

Fudzilla staff

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