Featured Articles

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC’s next generation 16nm process has reached an important milestone – 16nm FinFET Plus (16FF+) is now in risk production.

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 10 August 2009 06:24

Indie developers unhappy with pricing change

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Some suggest that it will be a race to the bottom

On August 11th when Microsoft officially launches the next batch of updates for the Xbox 360, the Microsoft Xbox Live Community Games will be getting an overhaul, as we have told you about previously. While the name will chance to Xbox Live Indie Games, so too will the pricing structure, which will now feature lower price points ranging from $1 to $5 with the new structure.

While Microsoft claims that they are responding to the requests of developers who are saying that sales will be higher if they prices are lower, it seems that not all hobbyist/amateur/bedroom developers seem to feel that the new pricing structure will actually benefit all developers. Some might now actually be discouraged from using the Xbox Live Indie Games program to distribute the programs that they develop because simply the new pricing structure could lead to nothing more than a race to see who can sell the highest quality titles for the least amount of money.

Some Indie developers are already saying that the new pricing strategy, which caps the highest possible price at $5, is too low. Some have commented that while they don’t see a problem with offering lower price points, they think that higher end and high quality titles will not be developed if they can only be sold for $5 on the high end. Some developers suggest that some titles that have been released offer content that is simply worth more than $5.

It seems that the debate between different factions of Indie developers over this very issue has been very heated. Some are suggesting that some developers want the lower prices to make up for poor sales of titles that were “marginal” to begin with.

Other developers claim that some blame the old pricing scheme for their lack of sales and they are not actually interpreting the sales data correctly to draw the right conclusions on what the cause for lack of sales actually is.

We suspect that the discussion over pricing will not go away anytime soon, but we hate to think that some developers will be scared off from putting a product out because they just don’t think there is any money to be made because of the pricing scheme that will be in place going forward. Only time will tell how this will shake out.

Last modified on Monday, 10 August 2009 10:15

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments