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Friday, 07 August 2009 12:49

Quantum computing might be more stable

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Stable quantum, contradiction in terms

Quantum computing
might more stable than previously thought, according to the latest research.

Tom Stace, a University of Queensland (UQ) physicist, found that with even 50 percent loss of components, they could still work, unlike conventional computers, which would have broken down. Quantum computers can still work with relatively large errors and losses. It means that a useful quantum device can be built even if up to 10 percent of its components suffer an error, or up to 50 percent of the components are completely lost.

Errors are a bit problem in quantum devices as they are sensitive to noise in their surroundings. It is important that a useful device can be made from imperfect components. Quantum computing was still in its early days, but it had the potential to revolutionise computers because of its potential to be much more powerful than current computers, especially in fields such as banking where security of transactions is paramount.

Nick Farell

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