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Friday, 03 April 2009 12:12

Anti-piracy law scares Swedes

Written by Nick Farell

Image

At least for five minutes


A law
designed to make it easier for copyright holders to go after illicit file-sharers appears to have have led to a major drop in Internet traffic.

The Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement Directive (IPRED) law came into force yesterday and suddenly Internet traffic plummeted by 30 per cent according to figures from the Netnod Internet Exchange. It suggests that fileshareing has dropped even more.

Most experts think that after the initial scare effect, trafffic will pick up in a week or two. Swedish Pirate Party Chairman Rick Falkvinge told TorrentFreak, that the movie and music industry thrives on scaring the common citizen. Henrik Pontén from Antipiratbyrån, the Swedish anti-piracy office, claimed that the traffic drop as an indication that the new law is working.

Well not really, in the past 24 hours 384,657 Swedes were connected to the Pirate Bay tracker alone. That is close to 5% of the Swedish population, and no less than before.

It seems that most people are looking for ways to hide their identities online. Thousands of new customers have visited new anonymising service mullvad.net.
Last modified on Friday, 03 April 2009 14:51

Nick Farell

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