Featured Articles

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel has revealed an update to its CPU roadmap and some things have changed in 2015 and beyond. Let’s start with the…

More...
Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 04 December 2008 14:45

Technology rewires brains

Written by Nick Farell

Image

My brain hurts


Brain boffins
claim that using the computer too much might be hardwiring our grey matter to work in a different way.

Gary Small, a psychiatrist at UCLA, has a theory that daily exposure to digital technologies such as the Internet and smart phones can alter how the brain works. He reckons that if the brain spends more time on technology-related tasks and less time exposed to people, users forget fundamental social skills, like reading facial expressions during conversation.

This leads to social awkwardness, an inability to interpret non-verbal messages, isolation and less interest in traditional classroom learning. Although it is fair to say a lot of people are like that without ever going near a computer.

People in their teens and 20s have been "digitally hard-wired since toddlerhood" and it is important to help them improve their social skills.

More here.
Last modified on Friday, 05 December 2008 06:12

Nick Farell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments