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Wednesday, 10 September 2008 12:18

Apple loses spat with NBC Universal

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Gives up


Apple seems to have done the unthinkable and actually has done what another company wanted.

For ages Apple has not run NBC Universal programs on its iTunes jukebox because the company refused to do what it was told and gratefully accept whatever Steve Jobs thought he should pay them. Much to his horror, NBC executives told him to go forth and multiply and went and flogged their programs elsewhere.

Now it seems that Apple has discovered that it needs NBC Universal more than it needs Apple and yielded to some demands on pricing and packaging made by the media conglomerate. NBC shows such as 30 Rock and The Office would return to iTunes a year after the spat started.

NBC announced that it would offer some catalog titles for 99 cents rather than the traditional $1.99 that Apple charges for TV downloads.

It is now clear that while Apple was saying that NBC wanted to charge more cash for its shows and Steve was doing his best to keep the prices down, in fact it was the opposite.
Last modified on Thursday, 11 September 2008 03:28

Nick Farell

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