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Thursday, 04 September 2014 10:11

Ouya just might be looking for a buyer

Written by David Stellmack

Company has continued to struggle

Ouya could be looking for a buyer according to Kara Swisher and Eric Johnson in a recent article on Recode. The initial Kickstarter funded micro-console has just continued to struggle and the company has reached out to a number of companies including Xiaomi, Tencent, Google, Amazon, as well as others.

While the situation for Ouya isn’t apparently dire, it just seems that the console has not been able to gain any real traction and despite working very hard at getting software developed for the console, they have had little luck getting anything that is attracting significant attention.

It does seem however that the console has found a significant niche as a retro video game emulation system with multiple emulators available with the ability to play games for the majority of the major retro consoles. (It is even able to do emulation for some of the lesser known retro consoles as well!)

Still nothing seems to have translated into actual hard sales. With an initial plan that included the release of a more advanced console every couple of years, Ouya has failed at getting this console going and it hasn’t been helped by several other makers who have come into this space. It seems that it just lacks the kinds of titles that attract people to console. It also could be that lack of embracing the free-to-play model coupled with a difficult to navigate store and a lack of OS enhancements has not helped the situation.

Ouya is not at an end by any means. The company has partnered with Mad Catz on a console that uses their software. It has launched a subscription services like Netflix that allows players to play all they want on included games. They have killed off the required “demo” requirement for games. It has also surprisingly partnered with Xiaomi to put the Ouya software on set-top boxes and smart TV’s that are made by the Chinese company.

We will have to see what happens, but seems as if there is a good chance that someone else might end up owning Ouya before it is all said and done.

ouya blackc 1

 

David Stellmack

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