Featured Articles

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Tuesday, 29 July 2014 08:59

$4 Allwinner chips power $60 tablets

Written by Fudzilla staff

allwinner-logo

Making Allwiner the second biggest tablet SoC player

Chinese chip outfit Allwiner is currently the second biggest supplier of tablet SoC parts in terms of sheer volume, although most of its chips can't hold a candle to powerful Apple, Samsung and Qualcomm parts used in high-end tablets.

Allwinner makes its money on the Chinese white-box market. As a result most of its chips have to be very cheap. One example is the Allwinner A33, which recently entered production according to Liliputing

The chip sells for just $4 and it is used in cheap white-box tablets with Android 4.4 on top. Some of the tablets cost as little as $60. The chip has four Cortex A7 cores clocked at 1.3GHz backed by ARM Mali-400 MP2 graphics. It supports screen resolutions up to 1280x800, which is still enough in this market segment.

The A33 is a far cry from first-tier flagship parts like the Snapdragon 801, Tegra K1 or Apple's A7. However, at $4 it is in a league of its own, as it costs just a fraction of what a vendor would have to pay for a high-end SoC.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments