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Thursday, 19 June 2014 09:37

Security on networks like a chocolate teapot

Written by Nick Farrell



Reality hits industry

Security experts have woken up and realised that their systems are really not doing much to protect corporate networks from hackers.

More than 85 per cent of information security professionals believe their existing technology can't prevent endpoint infections, according to the results of a survey conducted by Bromium. The Bromium research features responses from more than 300 information security professionals. Results of the survey were validated in an independent NSS Labs Test Report. The same number think that anti-virus solutions are unable to prevent against targeted attacks and you might as well have a nice cup of tea instead.

The survey with the catchy title, "Endpoint Protection: Attitudes and Opinions," reveals that 72 per cent of respondents say end users are their biggest security concern and killing these off would be much more useful than any software or firewall. Sixty-five percent of information security professionals are still searching for endpoint protection that can stop known and unknown threats which is still about as rare as the Holy Grail.

New initiatives, such as the Internet of Things, causing businesses to adopt new forms of technology, threats are expected to increase. For example, 70 per cent of IT decision-makers at small-to-mid-size businesses do not believe the C-Suite will increase IT spending to provide them with the resources necessary to tackle additional security problems created by the Internet of Things, according to a survey conducted by Opinion Matters for GFI Software.

Nick Farrell

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