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Friday, 30 May 2014 10:45

ISPs warn 1.3 million “pirates”

Written by Nick Farrell

Six strikes working then

The US six strikes copyright alert system is not doing that well according to the Center for Copyright Information (CCI). In the first year of the newly implemented system the CCI sent out more than 1.3 million alerts to 722,820 user accounts.

Of those alerts, 72 per cent fell under the “educational” category, which indicate the first two of the six strikes. Only 8 per cent of those users went on to reach the mitigation stage (strikes 5 and 6), which leads CCI to believe that the alerts are deterring most users from continuing to engage in piracy.

According to the report, what we’ve seen so far is just phase one of the programme. CCI is only just now “ready for full operation.” In the next year, Internet providers are expected to double the amount of alerts they send to their customers, and “CCI will be developing additional educational programming and engaging in copyright awareness-building activities.”

CCI has found that most consumers are willing to admit that copyright infringement is inappropriate and that they are confused as to which online sources are legal or not.

But what this is not saying is at the same time legitimate entertainment services have grown like crazy during this time. Netflix, Pandora and countless others have been bringing pirates in from the cold and giving them a legitimate method of downloading content they want. Piracy appears to be more viable in areas where content is not available or is too expensive.

Nick Farrell

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