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Wednesday, 30 April 2014 06:39

KFA2 GTX 750 OC reviewed - Gaming results

Written by Sanjin Rados

kfa2-thumbrecommended08 75

Review: Low-profile GTX 750 card

Today’s AAA games offer an impressive glimpse into a virtual world comprised of hundreds of thousands of polygons, high resolution textures and a lot of special effects. The visuals are stunning, provided you have a graphics card that can handle the load.

Nowadays high-end GPUs ship with at least 3GB of GDDR5 memory, but on the other side of the spectrum you can still find plenty of entry-level and lower mid-range cards with just 1GB of memory. KFA2’s GTX 750 is one of them, it features just 1GB of GDDR5. However, it is still a surprisingly potent card, especially when you factor in the ~€100 price tag. It can handle most games on medium/high detail settings, at 1080p. Even the most demanding games available today can be enjoyed at 1080p, but the detail levels need to be dialled down a notch.

Many partners offer 2GB versions in this market segment, but to be honest in most cases you won’t be able to tell the difference. To make good use of more memory you also need a faster GPU.

During our Battlefield 4 test at 1080p, with high in-game settings, we noticed that the memory is almost constantly filled to capacity.

memory usage at 1080p at high settings - in game

However, when we reduced the level of detail using GPU Experience optimal settings for 1080p, the game used up to 900MB of memory.

geforce experience optimized

memory usage optimized with experience at 1080p

The good news is that you can enjoy Battlefield 4 with optimised settings. Even at high in-game settings we managed to get about 37fps. The GTX 750 cannot cope with ultra in-game settings, but with a bit of optimisation it should deliver playable frame rates at 1080p.


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(Page 5 of 8)
Last modified on Wednesday, 30 April 2014 06:39
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