Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 29 January 2014 12:21

Old Wi-Fi holding back the new

Written by Nick Farrell



Cisco moans

Old Wi-Fi standards are now holding back the newer, faster protocols that followed in their wake, Cisco Systems claims.

IEEE 802.11, now available in numerous versions with speeds up to 6.9Gbps and growing, still requires devices and access points to be compatible with technologies that date to the late 1990s. But Cisco said that these older standards are not nearly as efficient.

It is calling on the 802.11 Working Group and the Wi-Fi Alliance to find a way to let some wireless gear leave those versions behind. According to Network World two Cisco engineers proposed the idea last week in a presentation at the working group's meeting in Los Angeles.

Brian Hart, a principal engineer at Cisco and engineer Andrew Myles said that one of the main reasons 2.4GHz has a bad reputation is traffic sent using old, slow forms of Wi-Fi, according to. That happens partly because of outdated code written back when early Wi-Fi versions were more prevalent, and partly because of IEEE and Wi-Fi Alliance requirements for supporting the lower rates. 

Their plan is to make the best use of the 2.4GHz band, the smaller of two unlicensed frequency blocks where Wi-Fi operates. It does not affect the 5GHz band, which most modern Wi-Fi gear can use in addition to 2.4GHz. The 5GHz band has more available bandwidth and is less crowded, while the lower frequencies are sometimes called a "junk band" because so many devices use it for Bluetooth, baby monitors and other technologies in addition to Wi-Fi.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments