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Wednesday, 25 December 2013 09:20

Samsung’s super secure Knox software isn’t secure

Written by Fudzilla staff



Israeli researchers issue damning report

It appears that Samsung’s Knox security system is anything but secure. Samsung rolled out Knox in the hopes of attracting more security savvy consumers to the Galaxy S4.

Corporate users place an emphasis on security and for years BlackBerry was the king of the secure always-on market. Knox was expected to give Samsung a competitive edge and allow it to seize more BYOD market share.

However, a team of Israeli researchers from the Ben Gurion University of the Negev found that Knox does not live up to its name. The researchers identified a vulnerability that allows corporate data to leak through the secure container. In theory, it should be possible to inject malicious code from outside the container and compromise its integrity.

Hackers could then gain complete access to communications records, messages and emails. Worse, an infected phone could go on to infect other phones in a secure network.

The university stressed that the vulnerability is a serious threat and the team classified it as a “category one” vulnerability, which is as bad as it gets. The rating is reserved for vulnerabilities that enable remote attacks on secure networks.

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