Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 18 December 2013 08:07

AMD teams up with SK Hynix for 3D memory

Written by Fudzilla staff



Stacked with love

AMD and SK Hynix have announced that they will jointly develop high-bandwidth 3D stacked memory technologies and products.

AMD is pinning its hopes on APUs, which are a good way of using silicon efficiently and using the same package for the GPU and CPU. However, APUs require a lot of bandwidth, i.e. even cheap APUs benefit from somewhat faster memory modules, and let’s not forget about GDDR5 rumours, which did not pan out with Kaveri.

3D stacked memory should be used as high-bandwidth memory (HBM) that’s smaller yet faster than GDDR5. It can be used as system RAM or graphics memory. HBM was developed mainly for graphics applications and it should enter mass production in 2015. Built using new Wide I/O and TSV technologies, it should support bandwidths from 128GB/s to 256GB/s.

Such bandwidth makes a lot more sense when it comes to GPUs, at least at this point. Both Nvidia and AMD are expected to use stacked memory in their 20nm products, but probably not in first-generation 20nm products.

It remains unclear when AMD will embrace the technology for APUs. This would be somewhat more complicated, at least in consumer products that have to rely on off the shelf technology and components, which makes deployment of new technologies much slower.

blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments