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Wednesday, 02 July 2008 07:42

NatSemi ventures into solar panels

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Makes panels that even work on cloudy days

National Semiconductor is entering the photovoltaic market with new technology that is designed to maximize the effectiveness of solar panels under varying light conditions. National Semiconductor has announced its SolarMagic™ technology that recovers up to 50 percent of lost solar energy, even in shaded panel conditions.

This new technology maximizes the energy output of each solar panel by actually compensating for the energy lost due to cloudy days, shadows from dust or dirt on the panels, shadows from tree branches or power lines or neighboring structures and from mismatch of solar panels.

Typical residential solar installations are often disproportionately affected by shade-causing conditions which greatly limit the design and location as well as energy output. National Semiconductor's SolarMagic technology minimizes the system impact of shading and other outdoor conditions, while maximizing the energy output of each solar panel.

Existing solar panel systems operate on a “weakest link,” theory, where one or two compromised panels can take down the entire string or array of panels. This is comparable to a section of a string of Christmas lights that all go out when even one light fails.

With the new SolarMagic technology and panels operate independently, such that if one panel in a solar installation is shaded or dirty, or otherwise can’t produce much solar energy, the panel can still operate and produce what it can while the other panels are not affected and continue to operate at their full potential.

Read how it works here.

Last modified on Wednesday, 02 July 2008 07:56

David Stellmack

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