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Friday, 22 November 2013 10:33

Intel wants to expand contract chipmaking

Written by Nick Farrell



Anything for a buck

Even if it means that it will be the first to make ARM’s 64-bit chips, Intel said that it wants to expand its contract foundry work. Intel CEO Brian Krzanich said he would expand his company's small contract manufacturing business, paving the way for more chipmakers to tap into the world's most advanced process technology.

Krzanich told analysts that he planned to step up the company’s foundry work, effectively giving Intel’s process technology to its rivals. He said that company’s who can use Intel’s leading edge and build computing capabilities that are better than anyone else's, are good candidates for foundry service. Krzanich added that the slumping personal computer industry, Intel's core market, was showing signs of bottoming out.

Intel also unveiled two upcoming mobile chips from its Atom line designed interchange features to create different versions of the component. A high-end version of the new chip, code named Broxton, and is due out in mid-2015. SoFIA, a low-end chip was shown as an example of Intel's pragmatism and willingness to change how it does business. Krzanich said that in the interest of speed, SoFIA would be manufactured outside of Intel, with the goal of bringing it to market next year.

Intel will move production of SoFIA chips to its own 14 nanometer manufacturing lines, Krzanich added.

Nick Farrell

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