Featured Articles

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel refreshes CPU roadmap

Intel has revealed an update to its CPU roadmap and some things have changed in 2015 and beyond. Let’s start with the…

More...
Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Thursday, 21 November 2013 12:47

Cyber identities drop in price

Written by Nick Farrell



Buy someone now for Christmas

The price of a stolen identity has dropped as much as 37 percent in the cybercrime underground to $25 for a US identity, and $40 for an overseas identity.

Researcher Joe Stewart of Dell SecureWorks teamed with independent researcher David Shear to get an insider's look at the cost of hacking services. For $300 or less, you can acquire credentials for a bank account with a balance of $70,000 to $150,000, and $400 is all it takes to get a rival or targeted business knocked offline with a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS)-for-hire attack.

Meanwhile they have noticed that the cost of ID theft and bank account credentials are getting cheaper because there is just so much out there. Part of the problem is that so many US organisations have been hacked and personal details stolen. Personal identities, went for $40 per U.S. stolen ID and $60 for a stolen overseas ID in 2011 when Dell SecureWorks last studied pricing in the underground marketplace. Now those IDs are 33 to 37 percent cheaper.

Competition among the cybergangs is stiffer as more people join in the scams, the report said.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments