Featured Articles

Intel takes credit for three-way 4K gaming

Intel takes credit for three-way 4K gaming

All of a sudden Intel is talking about desktop gaming like there is no tomorrow and it is pushing it. The…

More...
Nvidia Shield Tablet 32GB 4G LTE out for pre orders

Nvidia Shield Tablet 32GB 4G LTE out for pre orders

Nvidia has finally revealed the shipping date of its Shield Tablet 32GB in 4G LTE flavour and in case you pre-order…

More...
Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple announces its Apple Watch

Apple has finally unveiled its eagerly awaited smartwatch and surprisingly it has dropped the "i" from the brand, calling it simply…

More...
Skylake 14nm announced

Skylake 14nm announced

Kirk B. Skaugen, Senior Vice President General Manager, PC Client Group has showcased Skylake, Intel’s second generation 14nm architecture.

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 20 November 2013 12:17

Hollywood admits lying about copyright takedowns

Written by Nick Farrell



We issue false takedowns

In amongst the court case against cyberlocker Hotfile, Warner Bros has admitted that it issued false takedowns of content on purpose. While it had been expected that the automatic takedowns were “false positives” and all a terrible mistake, it appears that it was diberate.

Hotfile provided a takedown tool to the studios so that they could take down illegal content. However Warner insisted on using it to take down a variety of content that was non-infringing and had nothing to do with Warner Bros. WB initially said that it filed a bunch of false takedowns, but said it was no big deal because it was all done by a computer, which was what everyone expected. However it turned out that at least one work was taken down by a WB employee, and that employee had done so on purpose.

Hotfile is trying to carry out a countersuit against Warner which accuses it of perjury. Lawyers seem to think the case is sadly a little weak because the DMCA clause relating to perjury is a badly worded. The studio practically told the court that the way copyright law is written, it can take down whatever it wants and no one can stop it.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments