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Tuesday, 19 November 2013 14:42

Nvidia does deal with Big Blue

Written by Nick Farrell



Supercomputing plans

IBM and Nvidia have signed up in a cunning plan to combine Tesla GPUs and Power CPUs. The big idea is to push the new Tesla cards as workload accelerators for specific datacentre tasks.

Nvidia is a member of the OpenPower consortium, which opened IBM's Power architecture up for licensing and broad adoption to various interested parties. The partnership would help Nvidia as it tries to push CUDA into more high-end, big iron deployments where Power servers are still well represented.

According to Nvidia's release, Tesla GPUs will ship alongside Power8 CPUs, which are currently scheduled for a mid-2014 release date. Power8 is the next version of IBM's architecture will have a 4GHz clock speed and offer up to 12 cores, with 96KB of L1 and 512K of L2 per core and 96MB of L3 on the entire chip.

Nick Farrell

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