Featured Articles

Apple iPad Air 2 costs $275 to build

Apple iPad Air 2 costs $275 to build

IHS has told Recode that the Apple iPad Air 2 16GB Wifi costs only $275 to build -- not bad…

More...
LG sells 16.8 million smartphones in Q3 14

LG sells 16.8 million smartphones in Q3 14

As Samsung is losing market share, another Korean company, which many had written off, is gaining.

More...
LG G Watch R EU price set at €299

LG G Watch R EU price set at €299

LG G Watch R is probably the best looking Android Wear device on the market and many have been waiting for…

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Gainward GTX 970 Phantom previewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 27 September 2013 03:37

Google announces new Hummingbird search algorithm

Written by Peter Scott

Been in use for over a month

A couple of months ago we started hearing complaints from people running smaller sites about Google’s changes to its news algorithm, which seemed to favour bigger sites a lot more than before. The changes were never announced officially, but Google’s changes to the core search algorithm are announced periodically and this morning Google announced the latest one.

The new algorithm is called Hummingbird and as always Google promises it will deliver better search results and allow users to search for more complex queries, something Google likes to call “conversational search”. It allows Google to parse questions a bit faster, and smarter.

Unlike Panda, Penguin and other updates, Hummingbird appears to be an all new algorithm, not a refresh of an existing one.

The new algorithm has been in use for over a month and it doesn’t appear to have caused any drastic changes, or user complaints for that matter. Hummingbird allows Google to process indexed information in a different way, but apparently the indexing process hasn’t been changed much. Google did not say anything about SEO, either.

There are some complaints from the SEO crowd, however, and they insist their traffic is going down, which is good news for legitimate publishers and people who actually create original content. The advent of content mills and downright SEO scams hasn’t gone unnoticed by Google, but the search seems to be unable to do much about it, as it’s always one step behind – and it’s a never ending battle.

Peter Scott

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments