Featured Articles

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

Hands on: Nvidia Shield Tablet with Android 5.0

We broke the news of Nvidia's ambitious gaming tablet plans back in May and now the Shield tablet got a bit…

More...
Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia N1 Android tablet ships in Q1 2015

Nokia has announced its first Android tablet and when we say Nokia, we don’t mean Microsoft. The Nokia N1 was designed…

More...
Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell launches octa-core 64-bit PXA1936

Marvell is better known for its storage controllers, but the company doesn’t want to give up on the smartphone and…

More...
TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC 16nm FinFET Plus in risk production

TSMC’s next generation 16nm process has reached an important milestone – 16nm FinFET Plus (16FF+) is now in risk production.

More...
Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia GTX 970 SLI tested

Nvidia recently released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture, with exceptional performance-per-watt. The Geforce GTX 970…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Sunday, 15 September 2013 11:04

Atom leapfrogs tick tock in 2014

Written by Fuad Abazovic

Just one 22nm generation, then straight to 14nm

Two generations in 14nm, two in 10nm and so on. That’s how Intel rolls. Atom is no exception, but big changes are coming. It has been doing the same tick tock dance for quite some time and after 32nm Cedar Trail generation it came down to 22nm, with a new design codenamed Bay Trail.

Rani N. Borkar, Vice President General Manager, Intel Architecture Development Group has said Fudzilla that this is about to change. We expect to see Airmot in 2014 as the next generation Atom and this is going to be a 14nm chip. Intel didn’t want to comment on any launch schedule just that it is coming in the next year. In all goes well we expect to see it at IDF 2014, roughly a year from now. Intel plans a refreshed version of Atom in 2015, developed again in 14nm manufacturing process but with some improvements.

This is the strategy that Intel plans employ before it gets to 10 nm Atoms and beyond, making consumers get a new Atom based chip every year, or almost every year. Bay Trail Atom is now also ending up with Celeron and Pentium branding, making it harder for end users to actually keep track of different models and know what sort of CPU core they are buying.

Intel still has many ideas how to survive in the new mobile-centric world. Intel as we know it might be a thing of the past, as the chipmaker is undergoing its biggest transformation in years, perhaps even the biggest transformation in its long history.

Instead of battling with one competitor in the x86 market, it is now having to face a dozen of them, at least in phone and tablet market and Intel is slowly learning how to live with this.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments