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Monday, 09 September 2013 22:44

Intel changes its state of mind

Written by Fuad Abazovic

IDF 2013: Experience more important than speed

Brian David Johnson, futurist and principal engineer at Intel, has made it clear that the culture at Intel has changed.

Today Intel emphasises the importance of user experience rather than just talking about speed and size. For many decades Intel tried to sell the story that it is the fastest and best solution around, but all of a sudden after many years dominance, Intel was forced to change its mind in the post-iPhone world.

It also helps on a different level. If you don’t have the fastest and best chip in the mobile phone space it makes sense to start taking about the importance of experience. IDF 2013 definitely brings a wind of change, it might be the work of Intel’s new CEO Brian Krzanich, but it’s probably more related to the company’s delayed reaction to the market situation. Some cogs were put into motion before Krzanich took the helm.

The iPhone is one of many products that prove that the size of the screen or the speed of processor aren’t the key deciding factor, and Intel has started to realize it.

Intel sees that More’s law is safe for the next 10 plus years and it can still bring a lot to the table thanks to its immense R&D budget and unparalleled manufacturing capabilities, but fighting the ever growing ARM threat won’t be a walk in a park.

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