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Thursday, 20 June 2013 09:54

Government orders Google to change algorithm

Written by Nick Farrell



Stop promoting illegal goods


Three US state attorneys general want Google to change the way its search engine displays results to stop the sale of illegal goods. So far Google is not facing charges, but it is possible that it might do soon.

Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood has accused Google of helping facilitate the sale of hot gear.After Google appeared to ignore him, Hood announced that he will subpoena Google’s business records to find out more about how its search engine works.
If he does succeed in getting that information, then Google might explain why it seems to have a campaign to kill off small news sites in favour of bigger ones. We are getting reports that readership figures of small tech sites have fallen by a quarter after Google changed its search algorithm recently.

Hood is teaming up with attorneys general from Virginia and Hawaii and accused Google of “assisting in the sale of prescription drugs without a prescription and intentionally ignoring reports of rogue pirate sites selling stolen music, movies, software and video games.”

Google has previously said it is working to fight the problem.


Nick Farrell

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