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Thursday, 25 April 2013 11:21

Samsung now says eight-cores don’t really matter

Written by Peter Scott

What we’ve been saying all along

Samsung spent weeks and weeks talking up its Exynos 5 Octa earlier this year, but now it is saying that octa-core chips really don’t matter.

The Galaxy S4 is Samsung’s first device to feature the new quasi-octa-core SoC, but in quite a few markets it will ship with a Qualcomm 600 chip instead. Now Samsung is telling the world that the number of cores doesn’t matter, which is what we’ve been saying all along.

Speaking at the sidelines of an event in New York, head of Samsung’s mobile business J.K. Shin told CNET that the general public won’t really notice the different, or won’t care. Both chips will deliver a similar consumer experience, he said.

"We use multiple different sources," Shin said. "It's a sourcing issue."

However, it is more than a mere sourcing issue. Samsung LSI didn’t have enough time to churn out millions of octa chips needed for the SGS4 launch. Shin also said that the decision to use a Qualcomm chip had nothing to do with LTE compatibility or other factors.

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