Featured Articles

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 22 April 2013 09:45

BadNews malware hits millions of Android devices

Written by Fudzilla staff

Bad news indeed

Google’s relatively relaxed app policy was a pretty good way of attracting small developers and growing the Android ecosystem, but it also resulted in a flood of malware and horrible apps.

Now it appears that a particularly nasty bit of malware has been downloaded millions of times from Google’s own Play Store. It seems to have been included in a number of Russian clone apps, the sort of stuff most users don’t download, but it still managed to end up on millions of devices, reports Tech Crunch.

Dubbed BadNews, the code was distributed through 32 different apps uploaded using four developer accounts. It is unclear how many devices were affected, but security researchers put the figure at two to nine million. BadNews fakes alerts and encourages users to download other infected apps, including costly premium SMS scam apps. It also scoops up the infected device’s IMEI and sends it back to its masters.

Google has already pulled the affected apps but the damage has been done. It is estimated that half of the infected users hail from Russia, which is slowly becoming malware central in the Android world. Since Russian authorities are preoccupied with arresting and prosecuting female punk bands, the situation probably won’t improve anytime soon.

Fudzilla staff

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments