Featured Articles

Android Wear installed on 50-100k phones

Android Wear installed on 50-100k phones

Android Wear is a companion app that you need in order to run your new Android Wear watch.

More...
AMD launches 45W desktop Kaveri parts, finally

AMD launches 45W desktop Kaveri parts, finally

AMD has finally launched three 45W Kaveri SKUs, which were in the works for months. The three chips feature configurable TDP,…

More...
Desktop Broadwell LGA is Socket 1150

Desktop Broadwell LGA is Socket 1150

Broadwell was supposed to come in 2014 and it will ship in the last quarter of this year for detachable thin…

More...
Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

Nvidia officially launches the 8-inch Shield Tablet

As expected and reported earlier, Nvidia has now officially announced its newest Shield device, the new 8-inch Shield Tablet. While the…

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 17 April 2013 09:33

Oracle tarts up Java

Written by Nick Farrell



Patches 42 security holes

Oracle has released a major security update for the version of Java programming language that runs inside Web browsers.

The patch fixes 42 vulnerabilities within Java, including "the vast majority" of those that have been rated as the most critical. Oracle Executive Vice President Hasan Rizvisaid that a series of big security flaws in the Java plug-in for browsers have been uncovered in the past year by researchers and hackers, and some have been used by criminal groups. One hacking campaign infected computers using Microsoft Windows and Apple software inside hundreds of companies.

Earlier this year the US Department of Homeland Security recommended that computer users disable Java in the browser. But many large companies use internal software that relies on Java and have been pressing Oracle to make the language safer.
Perhaps the most significant change will be that, in the default setting, sites will not be able to force Java applets to run in the browser unless they have been digitally signed.

Not all known problems are being fixed with the current patch, but there are no unpatched problems that are being actively exploited, Rizvi said.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments