Featured Articles

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

It appears that Nvidia has been feeling the pulse of the market and took some note from comments regarding the original…

More...
iPhone 6 and 6 Plus reviews are up and they are good

iPhone 6 and 6 Plus reviews are up and they are good

Apple is dancing the same dance year after year. It releases the iPhone and two days before they start shipping it…

More...
Amazon announces three new tablets

Amazon announces three new tablets

Amazon has just released three new tablets starting with the $99 priced 6-inch Kindle Fire HD6. This is a 6-inch tablet…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 13 March 2013 10:59

Microsoft backs Flash

Written by Nick Farrell



It will save every one of us

While Apple seems to be gaining some mileage in its campaign to purge Flash from the net, Microsoft appears to be going the other way. For a while we had been expecting Redmond to copy Apple and move to HTML5 and walk away from Flash.

However IE 10 has proved that Microsoft still loves the Systems browser plug-in despite claiming a two years ago that browser plug-ins are a relic from the Internet's early days. At the time it said that it would ban them when IE10 was running with Windows 8's Metro user interface. However it didn’t and built in Adobe's plug-in directly into IE10.

Writing in the company blog Rob Mauceri, program manager of Microsoft's Internet Explorer group, said that Redmond has enabled Flash by default on both Windows 8 and Windows RT. Microsoft uses a blacklist to block Flash in the small number of sites that are still incompatible Microsoft for touch or that depend on other plug-ins.

Mauceri apparently sees Windows' Flash support now as a useful part of Microsoft’s cunning plan to spread Windows beyond PCs to tablets. While Flash is effectively dead for Android and iOS tablets, but Microsoft sees a role for it. He said IE10 with Flash on Windows 8 enables people to see more of the Web working with high quality, especially compared with the experience in other touch-first or tablet browsers and devices.

Adobe has done a lot of work to improve Flash and has been working closely with Microsoft so that it worked with Windows 8.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments