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Wednesday, 13 February 2013 10:27

Intel speeds up Linux servers with SSDs

Written by Nick Farrell



Thanks to Nevex Virtual buyout

Chipzilla has sped up Linux server SSDs using Cache Acceleration Software technology. 

Intel said that the solid- state drive-based Cache Acceleration Software (CAS) for Linux servers can dramatically speed up the performance of read-intensive applications. Intel said its CAS can triple the performance of SSDs on standard databases and offer up to 18 times improved performance on read-intensive online transaction processing applications.

The product supports caching on NAND flash in storage arrays and VMware vMotion. An Intel spokesman said that at the moment Intel’s CAS fixes I/O bottlenecks by accelerating applications. The latest update featuring support for Linux, enables administrators to use software that will benefit from the higher performance SSDs. They can also allow the CAS to automatically redistribute I/O intensive data to the flash memory.

The CAS technology was acquired by Intel from the Canadian startup Nevex Virtual Technologies which it bought last year.

Nick Farrell

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