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Thursday, 07 February 2013 11:19

Samsung phone goes all 787

Written by Nick Farrell



Assault and battery


A South Korean has been burned by a Samsung smartphone lithium-ion battery that caught fire in his trouser pocket. The man first noticed something was wrong when a woman asked him if that was a 787 in his pocket or was he just pleased to see her. No, actually we made that bit up.

Officials at Bupyeong Fire Station in Incheon city said the lithium-ion battery was not in the phone when it caught fire. Such batteries are quick to charge but prone to overheating. The man suffered second-degree burns and a small wound on his thigh which no doubt will be something to tell his grandchildren.

Officials declined to identify the man. Samsung said no investigation was planned after all their phone was working fine. It is the second known time in a year in South Korea that a Samsung smartphone battery has caught fire. In case you did not get the 787 gag, Lithium-ion batteries are behind the worldwide grounding of the US plane.

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