Featured Articles

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

Analysts expect ARM to do well next year

British chip designer ARM could cash in on the mobile industry's rush to transition to 64-bit operating systems and hardware.

More...
Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Huawei and Xiaomi outpace Lenovo, LG in smartphone market

Samsung has lost smartphone market share, ending the quarter on a low note and Xiaomi appears to be the big winner.

More...
Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

Intel Broadwell 15W coming to CES

It looks like Intel will be showing off its 14nm processors, codenames Broadwell, in a couple of weeks at CES 2015.

More...
Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Gainward GTX 980 Phantom reviewed

Today we’ll be taking a closer look at the recently introduced Gainward GTX 980 4GB with the company’s trademark Phantom cooler.

More...
Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac ZBOX Sphere OI520 barebones vs Sphere Plus review

Zotac has been in the nettop and mini-PC space for more than four years now and it has managed to carve…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Friday, 14 December 2012 11:08

Facebook in hot water Down Under

Written by Peter Scott

Mob-style hate pages need to go


A Facebook representative will meet with an Australian police chief over concerns that Facebook users are a mob that incites hatred and undermines the criminal justice system.

Victoria Police Commissioner Ken Lay criticized Facebook’s response to certain cases, namely the outfit’s failure to quickly remove hate pages targeting a murder-rape suspect earlier this year. In October Lay described the people behind the page as a mob.

The suspect in the case, one Adrian Ernest Bayley, had six hate pages devoted to him. He is still in custody and he will appear in court next January.

It is understandable that the public turns to Facebook to vent their frustration, given the brutal nature of Bayley’s crime, but police are concerned that hate pages devoted to suspects in criminal investigations could affect the outcome of the case. In other words, mob-style hate pages could have the opposite effect, as they could help the suspects facing trial.

Law enforcement agencies have already expressed similar concerns about other hate pages.

More here.

angrymob

Peter Scott

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments