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Tuesday, 13 May 2008 10:27

Microsoft launches telescope

Written by Nick Farell

Image

Make sure you look down the right end


Software giant,
Microsoft, has launched a free Web-based program that will allow punters to see stars. It will not be the first time that punters have seen stars when running Microsoft programs, but this time it is deliberate.

The WorldWide Telescope, developed by Microsoft's research arm, knits together images from the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory Center, the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and others.

You can have a look at the galaxy on your own or take a guided tours of different outer-space destinations. Punters can choose from a number of different telescopes and switch between different light wavelengths. In a press release, software supreme Bill Gates, Microsoft's Chairman, said the WorldWide Telescope is a powerful tool for science and education that makes it possible for everyone to explore the universe. 

Of course, they will have to look down the right end of it.
Last modified on Tuesday, 13 May 2008 17:08

Nick Farell

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