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Monday, 29 October 2012 10:32

Microsoft gives up on adult games ban

Written by Nick Farrell



Too much like Apple


Microsoft has decided that it is really not worth it and banning adult computer games from its Windows 8 store. Microsoft had thought that it would remove it from controversy by pitching itself as a “Family Software Company” and banning popular games from its stores and is Windows 8 stores.

The ban meant that Assassin's Creed, Mass Effect, Skyrim and other "mature" games where not allowed. The store is the official outlet for programs Microsoft has tested to ensure they work with Windows 8. However the problem was that there were different censorship ratings in the US which has a policy of loving violence but hating sex and swearing. Call of Duty, Skyrim and Mass Effect typically win a "mature" rating under its ESRB system. This means anyone aged 17 and over can play them. By contrast in Europe these titles and many others are marked as Pegi 18 which means only adults can buy and play them. This resulted in games being banned by Microsoft in more civilised countries.

Now Microsoft has relaxed its restrictions so the titles will be tested to work on PCs and tablets running Windows 8. To make matters worse the move could result in the games not being certified to work on Windows 8 which meant that Redmond would lose the mature game playing market which would be forced to stick to Windows 7. It might also lead to an anti-trust action from the software makers.

The Windows 8 testing and certification system has won criticism from many games makers. Relaxing the rules means the games can now get into the Windows Store and be guaranteed to run on Windows 8 be it running on a PC or tablet.

Nick Farrell

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