Featured Articles

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

Nvidia adjusts GTX 980 and GTX 970 pricing

It appears that Nvidia has been feeling the pulse of the market and took some note from comments regarding the original…

More...
iPhone 6 and 6 Plus reviews are up and they are good

iPhone 6 and 6 Plus reviews are up and they are good

Apple is dancing the same dance year after year. It releases the iPhone and two days before they start shipping it…

More...
Amazon announces three new tablets

Amazon announces three new tablets

Amazon has just released three new tablets starting with the $99 priced 6-inch Kindle Fire HD6. This is a 6-inch tablet…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 24 October 2012 09:23

Case against Sony over PSN hack all but dismissed

Written by Nedim Hadzic

playstation logo new

Perfect security is an illusion

The class action against Sony over the fiasco involving its PSN service is about to be dismissed, or at least all signs point to that.

The case argued that Sony showed negligence and violated consumer protection rights of California by denying restitution and injunctive relief claims. It was said that earlier attacks made it clear Sony’s network was vulnerable, but that the company still did nothing to address this.

However, judge Anthony Battaglia dismissed these claims for lack of evidence of actual economic loss. Plaintiffs apparently failed to produce any actual proof, although amending and resubmitting evidence is still an option.

Apparently, the fact that PSN service is free of charge helped Sony with charges of violating consumer protection laws. By consenting to the company’s privacy policy, users agreed to the notion of “no such thing as perfect security”. Thus, customers had no right to expect uninterrupted service at all times.

The case can be amended and evidence resubmitted by 9th of November, but it is not very likely that Sony will be found guilty in the end.

More here.

Last modified on Wednesday, 24 October 2012 10:23

Nedim Hadzic

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments