Featured Articles

HP Stream is a Chromebook killer priced at $200

HP Stream is a Chromebook killer priced at $200

We have been hearing reports of a new breed of affordable Windows notebooks for months. It is alleged that a number…

More...
AMD Radeon R7 SSD line-up goes official

AMD Radeon R7 SSD line-up goes official

AMD has officially launched its first ever SSDs and all three are part of AMD’s AMD Radeon R7 SSD series.

More...
KitKat has more than a fifth of Android users

KitKat has more than a fifth of Android users

Android 4.4 is now running on more than a fifth of Android devices, according to Google’s latest figures.

More...
Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool Dead Silence reviewed

Aerocool is well known for its gamer cases with aggressive styling. However, the Dead Silence chassis offers consumers a new choice,…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 22 October 2012 09:17

Pirate troll Righthaven to hand over hard-drives

Written by Nick Farrell



Or CEO has to pay $500 a day


Troubled copyright outfit Righthaven has to hand over its hard-drives or its CEO has to pay $500 a day.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Peggy Leen in Las Vegas told Righthaven to turn over to a creditor hard drives from its computers so the creditor could determine if Righthaven has any assets that can be liquidated. She gave Righthaven two weeks to surrender the drives or mirror images of them and said noncompliance would result in a daily sanction of $500 against the company and its CEO.

Righthaven CEO and Las Vegas attorney Steven Gibson fired off a letter to Righthaven’s attorney, Shawn Mangano, ordering him to comply with the directive. This is the latest in a yearlong effort by the creditor, former federal prosecutor Thomas DiBiase, to recover $119,488 in legal fees he was awarded after he beat back the Righthaven suit against him. Righthaven owes DiBiase and other creditors $318,000 for legal fees after Righthaven failed with its copyright lawsuits against them.

Righthaven partnered with the Las Vegas Review-Journal and the Denver Post to file 275 no-warning copyright infringement lawsuits in 2010 and 2011 against parties that used content from those papers without authorisation. But the whole thing backfired after three Judges rejected the lawsuits because Righthaven lacked standing as the newspapers — not Righthaven. Some defendants also were cleared by the fair use concept in copyright law allowing some uses of copyrighted material within limits.

Afterwards the company shut down and said it was broke.

Nick Farrell

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments