Featured Articles

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

Snapdragon 400 is Qualcomm’s SoC for watches, wearables

We wanted to learn a bit more about Qualcomm's plans for wearables and it turns out that the company believes its…

More...
Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

Qualcomm sampling 20nm Snapdragon 810

We had a chance to talk to Michelle Leyden-Li, Senior Director of Marketing, QCT at Qualcomm and get an update on…

More...
EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

EVGA GTX 970 SC ACX 2.0 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia GTX 980 reviewed

Nvidia has released two new graphics cards based on its latest Maxwell GPU architecture. The Geforce GTX 970 and Geforce GTX…

More...
PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

PowerColor TurboDuo R9 285 reviewed

Today we will take a look at the PowerColor TurboDuo Radeon R9 285. The card is based on AMD’s new…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Wednesday, 03 October 2012 09:33

What has Sony done inside the Super Slim PS3?

Written by David Stellmack

ps3 slim

Cost reduction not coming from die shrinks, it would appear

Everyone seems to want to know what is inside the new PlayStation 3 Super Slim, and the answer might surprise you. It would seem the stability of the current console comes because the company is using pretty much the same thing we saw in the last Slim PS3 unit.

Sony has elected to combine the Cell CPU and the RSX graphics core onto one chip, which is what Microsoft did in the latest 360 in order to achieve cost reductions while also improving the thermals over the previous generation of the Xbox 360.

While combining the two chips might sound like a good idea on the surface, it is a very complex process; and apparently Sony was not able to get it done for this round of cost reductions. The Super Slim PS3 uses the same Cell CPU and RSX. The chips would appear to be at 40nm. While it is scaled down, most of the hardware on the inside is unchanged from the Slim model.

It is clear that Sony has looked to other areas to save money, such as using cheaper plastics and doing away with the slot load Blu-ray drive. We suspect, however, that a move to 32nm (or maybe directly to 22nm?) is coming at some point for the Super Slim to be refreshed; this will help Sony squeeze more out of the console in order to drive the price even further down. Don’t look for it to happen soon, but it will happen at some point next year, we suspect.

blog comments powered by Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments