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Friday, 28 September 2012 10:10

Microsoft charged with anti-trust breach

Written by Nick Farrell



This is not a repeat from the 1990s


Software giant Microsoft will be charged for failing to comply with a 2009 ruling ordering it to offer a choice of web browsers.

EU antitrust chief said the move could mean a hefty fine for the company. Microsoft fought with the Commission for more than ten years before the Commission hit it with fines totaling more than $1.28 billion. The Commission, which opened an investigation into the issue in July, is now preparing formal charges against the company, EU Competition Commissioner Joaquin Almunia said.

According to Reuters the next step is to open a formal proceeding into the company's breach of an agreement. It should not be a long investigation because the company itself explicitly recognized its breach of the agreement. It is the second time Microsoft has failed to comply with an EU decision. If found guilty of breaching EU rules, it could be penalized up to $7.4 billion or 10 percent of its revenues for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2012.

Nick Farrell

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