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Friday, 27 July 2012 10:02

US bloke prints his own gun

Written by Nick Farrell



Only in America


While the US briefly reconsiders its constitutional requirements for all nutjobs to own assault rifles in the wake of the Colorado Batman killings, a bloke has shown how easy it is to build your own weapons.

According to ExtremeTech HaveBlue from the AR-15 forum claims to be the first person to construct and shoot a pistol partly made out of plastic, 3D-printed parts.

He apparently managed to fire 200 rounds with his part-plastic pistol without any sign of wear and tear, at least on the pistol. We think that what he was firing at might have had a few holes.

The .22-caliber pistol was formed from a 3D-printed AR-15 (M16) lower receiver, and a normal, commercial upper. The body of the gun is plastic, while the chamber is metal.
He used a Stratasys 3D printer and normal plastic resin. It cost him $30 of resin to create the lower receiver.

Fortunately HaveBlue tried to use the same lower receiver to make a full-blown .223 AR-15/M16 rifle, but it didn’t work.

What is worrying is that if the gun were fired into a crowd of people, and the person who was using their constitutional right to bear arms managed to escape, the weapon would be completely untraceable. It also means that people without gun licenses, or people who have had their licenses revoked because they were too nutty, could print their own gun.

Nick Farrell

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