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Wednesday, 23 May 2012 09:17

EU thinks Google plays monopoly

Written by Nick Farrell



Has too many hotels in Park Lane


The EU's antitrust watchdog says that Google may have abused its online dominance to sit on competition.

Earlier this week it offered the company a chance to settle the allegations to avoid formal charges and many of us wondered why.  After all it made a lot of dosh from fining Intel. Joaquin Almunia, the head of competition policy for the European Commission said that fast-moving markets would particularly benefit from a quick resolution of the competition issues identified.

He said that restoring competition swiftly to the benefit of users at an early stage is always preferable to lengthy proceedings, although these sometimes become indispensable to competition enforcement. Almunia hoped that Google seizes the opportunity to swiftly resolve EU concerns, for the benefit of competition and innovation in the sector.

In short, we will throw the book at Google if it does not pull finger and do our work for us. European officials have been conducting a formal antitrust investigation of Google since 2010 in response to complaints from some websites that the internet search giant was treating their search results different than its own.

Nick Farrell

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