Featured Articles

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

IHS teardown reveals Galaxy S5 BOM

Research firm IHS got hold of Samsung’s new flagship smartphone and took it apart to the last bolt to figure out…

More...
Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Galaxy S5, HTC One M8 available selling well

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 has finally gone on sale and it can be yours for €699, which is quite a lot of…

More...
Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel lists Haswell refresh parts

Intel has added a load of Haswell refresh parts to its official price list and there really aren’t any surprises to…

More...
Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

Respawn confirms Titanfall DLC for May

During his appearance at PAX East panel and confirmed on Twitter, Titanfall developer Respawn confirmed that the first DLC pack for…

More...
KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 GTX 780 Ti Hall Of Fame reviewed

KFA2 gained a lot of overclocking experience with the GTX 780 Hall of Fame (HOF), which we had a chance to…

More...
Frontpage Slideshow | Copyright © 2006-2010 orks, a business unit of Nuevvo Webware Ltd.
Monday, 14 April 2008 06:44

America gets WLan in buses

Written by David Stellmack

Image

Log on


In a big plus for mass transportation, city transit services have begun to offer wireless service to riders. Commuter buses, city buses and some commuter trains in more than 20 U.S. cities now offer wireless Internet, according to an informal survey by the American Public Transportation Association (APTA).

Colorado Springs, Colorado’s Mountain Metro Transit was the first to offer WiFi on its buses in 2004.  It is now also available in Cincinnati, Ohio; Dayton, Ohio; Seattle, Washington; San Francisco, California; Reno, Nevada; Austin, Texas; Boston, Massachusetts and the 45-mile trip to Worcester, Massachusetts; New York City and surrounding areas; Salt Lake City, Utah and surrounding areas.

Transportation officials said the wireless service has been well received and predicted its popularity will grow. APTA President William Miller predicts wireless Internet will become a service riders expect. "When I was a kid, you never thought of having an air-conditioned bus," he said. 

The cost to outfit a bus with wireless capability is not excessive, ranging from $1,000 to $2,000 for each. The Utah Transit Authority claims that the number of unique wireless users on its buses has increased from about 500 at January's start-up to 2,500 by the end of March.

Not all cities are enthusiastic about adding wireless services, however. The Washington D.C. Metro Area Transit Authority indicated that it had no plans to initiate wireless service at this time or in the foreseeable future.

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority is, however, thrilled that it has added wireless to its 45-mile rail line between Worchester and Boston since this past January. According to Deputy Chief of Staff, Kris Erickson, “it is probably the most well-received enhancement that we've ever done."


Last modified on Monday, 14 April 2008 11:40

David Stellmack

E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
blog comments powered by Disqus

To be able to post comments please log-in with Disqus

 

Facebook activity

Latest Commented Articles

Recent Comments